Overview

Psychology Program Overview

Why do people do the things they do? How do children learn and develop? How does prejudice form, and under what circumstances are people more likely to help one another? These are just a sample of questions that the field of psychology attempts to answer. The Major in Psychology offers a broad foundation for the understanding of behavior and mental processes. With a focus on human behavior and cognition, students in the major gain an understanding of individual differences, group behavior, and the impact of environmental and social factors. We provide students with the tools necessary for scientific study of behavior and the ability to concentrate the coursework in areas of particular interest, while getting the necessary breadth in social, cognitive, developmental, and clinical areas.

For example, the Major in Psychology—Counseling Track is available for students who plan to pursue postgraduate work in clinical or counseling professions. Additionally, students in the major may select advising concentrations in Global Citizenship, Psychology in the Community, and Child Welfare. Whether students are working towards an entry-level position or graduate school, the major in Psychology offers the necessary coursework, independent and collaborative research, and opportunities for application of knowledge to real-world settings.

Counseling Track 

The Major in Psychology-Counseling Track is designed to provide students with coursework related to the helping professions as well as a firm foundation in the science of human behavior. Courses related to the counseling field, including Counseling, Abnormal Psychology, Theories of Personality, Group Facilitation, and Sociology of Marriage and Family, are related in the major. Students in this major are well prepared for graduate programs in clinical psychology, counseling, social work, school counseling, marriage and family therapy, and related fields. Graduates are also ready to directly enter the workforce and be employed by a wide variety of social service organizations and programs that serve children and families, individuals with substance abuse problems, victims of domestic violence, individuals with chronic mental illness, and others.

Course Offerings

The Major in Psychology requires 46 credit hours with 36 hours in major courses and 10 hours in related areas. 

Required courses are:

PSY 101: Introductory Psychology (3 hrs.)
PSY 244: Introductory Neuroscience (3 hrs.)
PSY 299: Contemporary and Professional Issues in Psychology (2 hrs.)
PSY 312: Experimental Psychology (4 hrs.)
PSY 351-352: Senior Study (6 hrs.)
BIO 113: Principles of Organismal Biology (4 hrs.)
MTH 221: Inferential Statistics (3 hrs.)

Either of the following courses:
SOC 101: Introductory Sociology (3 hrs.)
    or
SOC 211: Cultural Anthropology (3 hrs.)


Eighteen (18) additional hours in psychology electives, at least 6 hours of which must be at the 300 or 400 levels. Psychology electives must include 3 hours from each of four domains (Cognitive, Developmental, Social, and Clinical). Note that some courses fall into multiple domains but may be counted toward fulfilling the requirement for only one domain.

 

cognitive:

PSY 314: Cognitive Psychology (4 hrs.)
PSY 315: Human Thought and Learning (3 hrs.)
PSY 327: Sensation and Perception (3 hrs.)

Developmental:

PSY 211: Child Development (3 hrs.)
PSY 218: Psychology of Adolescence (3 hrs.)
PSY 222: Adult Development and Aging (3 hrs.)
PSY 306: Language Development (3 hrs.)
PSY 334: Culturally Diverse and Exceptional Children (3 hrs.)

social:

PSY 221: Social Psychology (3 hrs.)
PSY 224: Cross-Cultural Psychology (3 hrs.)
PSY 301: Theories of Personality (3 hrs.)

clinical:

PSY 301: Theories of Personality (3 hrs.)
PSY 331: Abnormal Psychology (3 hrs.)
PSY 333: Counseling (3 hrs.)

A double major in Psychology and Child Development and Learning is not permitted.

The Major in Psychology with a Counseling Track requires 46 credit hours with 33 hours in major courses and 13 hours in related areas.

Required are:

PSY 101: Introductory Psychology (3 hrs.)
PSY 244: Introduction to Neuroscience (3 hrs.)
PSY 299: Contemporary and Professional Issues in Psychology (2 hrs.)
PSY 301: Theories of Personality (3 hrs.)
PSY 312: Experimental Psychology (4 hrs.)
PSY 331: Abnormal Psychology (3 hrs.)
PSY 333: Counseling (3 hrs.)
PSY 351-352: Senior Study (6 hrs.)
BIO 113: Principles of Organismal Biology (4 hrs.)
MTH 221: Inferential Statistics (3 hrs.)
PHR 235: Group Facilitation (3 hrs.)


 

 

 

One of the following:
PSY 211: Child Development (3 hrs.)
PSY 218: Psychology of Adolescence (3 hrs.)
PSY 222: Adult Development and Aging (3 hrs.)

One of the following:
PSY 314: Cognitive Psychology (4 hrs.)
PSY 315: Human Thought and Learning (3 hrs.)

One of the following:
SOC 101: Introductory Sociology (3 hrs.)
SOC 211: Cultural Anthropology (3 hrs.)
SOC 215: Sociology of Marriage and Family (3 hrs.)

 The Minor in Psychology consists of 15 hours in psychology with no fewer than two 300-level courses. The Minor in Psychology is not open to students majoring in Child Development and Learning.

Core Curriculum

The Maryville Curriculum, often called the “core” curriculum, consists of 51 credit hours. Some general education requirements are waived by virtue of the student’s major; others may be met by demonstration of competence. List of Core Courses:

Core Domain
Approved Existing Classes for New Core
(Other Courses to be added)
First Year Seminar FYS110
Composition & Speech ENG110 & ENG120
Quantitative Literacy MTH110
Religion, Spirituality and Critical Thought BIB130 or BIB140
Literary Studies LIT270 or LIT290
Historical Reasoning WCV180 or WCV190
Empirical Study of Person and Society PSY101, SOC101, PLS211, ECN221, ECN201
Culture and Intercultural Dynamics WRC370
Scientific Reasoning
[Students must complete 2 courses: 1 life science and 1 physical science. One of the 2 must include a lab]
SCI150, SCI350, BIO113, BIO115, BIO217, CHM111, CHM121, PHY101, PHY201
Mathematical Reasoning STA120, CSC111, MTH125
Second Language Completion of a 120 course in second language (e.g., SPN120, etc.)
Creative Arts FNA140, ART102, ART121, THT101, THT204,
3 HRS in any one of:
MUSE12, MUSE13, MUSE14, MUSE15, MUSE16, ART124, ART125, ART126
Ethical Citizenship in the World ETH490
U.S. Pluralism Designated Courses TBD

 

Learning Outcomes

  • Describes how the interaction of mind, body, and the socio-cultural environment affects behavior.
    1. Understands the nature of diversity
    2. Recognizes the wide variety of behavior that can be considered normal, as well as the multiple causes of varied behaviors
    3. Compares and contrasts major psychological systems
    4. Relates behavior to different developmental levels across the life-span
  • Critically reviews and analyzes psychological research.
    1. Uses and interprets quantitative and qualitative information appropriately
    2. Identifies relationships and synthesizes information
    3. Considers ethical issues
    4. Uses basic psychological terminology
 
  • Demonstrates ability to solve problems using the scientific mode of inquiry.
  • 4. Expresses oneself clearly and persuasively in writing and speaking professionally.
    1. Gives formal presentations
    2. Uses APA style in written communications as appropriate
  • Demonstrates empathy for and sensitivity to individuality and the influence of the human condition.
  • Utilizes and integrates appropriate technology to enhance professional and communication activities.

Career Options

A Major in Psychology can lead to careers in counseling, mental health, social work, human services, community agencies, recreational/occupational/rehabilitation therapy, advocacy, nonprofit organizations, development/fund-raising, activities director for special populations, youth work, data analysis, social/marketing/academic research, college student personnel, vocational counseling, substance abuse counseling, sales, marketing, public relations, customer service, or employee training. Some of these careers require advanced degrees.

A Major in Psychology-Counseling Track can lead to careers in mental health counseling, vocational counseling, school counseling, marriage and family, social work, human services, community agencies, recreational/occupational/rehabilitation therapy, advocacy work, positions in non-profit organizations, youth work, college student personnel, vocational counseling, and substance abuse counseling. While there are entry-level jobs available in many of these areas, an advanced degree is required for most therapeutic counseling positions.